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Manacles of the World
Manacles of the World: A Collector's Guide to International Handcuffs, Leg Irons & Other Miscellaneous Shackles & Restraints, T. L. Gross, privately published, St. Louis, MO, 1997, 11 " height X 8 1/2" width, 162 pages, softcover. First Printing, First Edition (May 1997). Over 170 photographs & illustrations. The seminal title on the topic.

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Handcuff Annual 2006
Handcuff Annual 2006, Joseph W. Lauher, Editor, Segatogue Press, Centereach, NY, 2006, 11" height X 8 1/2" width, 144 pages, spiral-bound softcover. First edition, First printing. Profusely and lavishly illustrated throughout, predominantly with photographs, in both colour and black & white. The first volume in a projected, ongoing yearly series.

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Handcuff Annual 2007
Handcuff Annual 2007, Joseph W. Lauher, Editor, Segatogue Press, Centereach, NY, 2007, 11" height X 8 1/2" width, 148 pages, spiral-bound softcover. First edition, First printing. Profusely and lavishly illustrated throughout, predominantly with photographs, in both colour and black & white. The second volume in an ongoing yearly series.

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French La Pegy Handcuffs with Original Plastic Bag
The single locking La Pegy handcuff was made in France during the 1950s. Sometimes thought to be derived from La Pègre, meaning "the gangster underworld", the actual derivation is from the French pronunciation of the initials PJ, for Police Judiciaire, meaning Criminal Investigation Department. The aluminium casing, or housing, has a brushed satin finish, and is stamp-marked LA PEGY over DEPOSE (meaning "trademark") on each cuff. The locks, the bows, or jaws, the two original keys and the five-link chain and attaching clevises are steel. The overall weight is light, only about 7 1/2 ounces. The original manufacturer's plastic bag is marked MENOTTES (meaning "handcuffs") over "LA PEGY" over DÉPOSÉE (again, meaning "trademark"). Unlike nearly all pairs of other handcuffs, the individual La Pegy cuffs are not mirror images of each other but are identical. Click here for an image of the handcuffs and their original manufacturer's plastic bag. The La Pegy is more than an handcuff; it is a fashion statement -- an extraordinarily elegant, stylish fashion statement. This one is in new condition. (An earlier version can be seen in the 1964 James Bond motion picture Goldfinger.)

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French Sûreté Nationale handcuffs
Mid-20th Century, single locking, oval-shaped French handcuffs. SURETÉ NATIONALE is stamp-marked on one of the anodised steel bows. One of the aluminium cuff casings is stamp-marked with D2685. The chain links and flat key are of steel. La Sûreté Nationale (literally, "National Safety" or "National Security") was established in France in 1812. It is the direct descendant of America's Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) and Britain's Criminal Investigation Department (CID) of Scotland Yard. It also is the prior name of La Police Nationale, the French National Police, established in 1966.

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French handcuffs
Circa 1940s, single locking, oval-shaped French handcuffs. Stamp-marked on one of the aluminium cuff casings A3749 and TD. The bows, connecting links and key are of steel. There was more than one version of this handcuff model. This version, with the centre connecting link a 1/4" height X 1/2" diameter cylindrical ring, is the rarer one.

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Early Clejuso 12D Handcuffs with Pouch
The prestigious, prolific German giant Clejuso -- an acronym for Clemen & Jung, Solingen -- was established in 1860. According to Manacles of the World author Tom Gross, the early model 12D, of which there were several variations, "may very well be the first Clejuso handcuff design. It is similar to the traditional French handcuffs in its elliptical or 'eggplant' shape." Of nickel plated steel, this double locking version is accompanied by its original leather pouch and original key. Very deeply stamp-marked Clejuso, in script, on each cuff. Clejuso states it introduced the model 12D in 1946. Click here for an image of the handcuffs and their pouch. Click here to see another pair, this one with its key marked CLEJUSO.

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Hiatt Figure Eight Handcuffs
A set of Hiatt (Birmingham, England) Figure Eight, also called Irish Eight, handcuffs, with working drum-cylinder lock and key. Deeply stamped on one side HIATT and on the other side BRITISH MADE. According to Hiatt Chairman G. W. Cross, "They were the first handcuffs issued to the Metropolitan Police of London in about 1832." Vintage, venerable and in excellent condition, many collectors regard this uniquely designed police restraint by this famous English maker of manacles to be the Holy Grail of handcuffs. The figure eight handcuff was Hiatt's number 103.

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Hiatt Figure Eight Handcuffs
Another, early pair of nickel plated Hiatt's famed "Figure of 8" handcuffs with the original, matching key. The cuffs stamped HIATT, 3 and 466; the key stamped HIATT and 466. In excellent condition and perfect working order with a tight, powerful spring.

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Hiatt Adjustable Darby Handcuffs
A set of Hiatt 115 adjustable darby handcuffs, with multiple locking positions. Each cuff and the original key are stamped HIATT; one cuff is stamped BRITISH MADE; the key also is stamped with the number 1 on both sides. Very brightly finished, in mint condition and in perfect working order. This is the standard style handcuff Sherlock Holmes would have known and used in Victorian England.

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Hiatt Nonadjustable Darby Handcuffs
A set of Hiatt 104 non-adjustable darby handcuffs, having a single locking position. Each cuff is stamp-marked HIATT, BEST, WARRANTED WROUGHT, HARD and 55. The original key is stamp-marked HIATT. In excellent condition and perfect working order.

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Hiatt 1960 Pattern Handcuffs
The case of the curiously curved, collectible cuffs: Hiatt's 1960 Pattern Handcuffs. Brightly chrome plated, in mint, unused condition, with the original key and box. Stamped HIATTS 1960 and BRITISH MADE on one of the cuffs. The box reads, "THIS HANDCUFF CAN DEFINITELY BE 'FLICKED' ON A PRISONER'S WRIST". Whilst the appeal of this double locking, single swivel model comes from its unusual shape, its introduction marked a major milestone in Hiatt handcuff history. Hiatt Chairman G. W. Cross states, "The 1960 pattern handcuff was the first ratchet, swing-through handcuff made by us." Tom Gross, in his book Manacles of the World, writes, "The Hiatt Model 1960, while never really popular, did serve to acquaint the British police community with the swing-through style of handcuff, broke down market resistance to that unfamiliar style, and paved the way for Hiatt's emergence as a major international supplier of modern handcuffs." Gross also notes, "The Hiatt Model 1960...[was] among the very few handcuffs ever produced with a round keyhole." Only in England, and only in the 1960s, they were the perfectly styled handcuffs for the stylishly perfect era of Swinging London.

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Hiatt 1960 Pattern Handcuffs
Another Hiatt's 1960 Pattern pair of handcuffs, also stamp-marked HIATTS 1960 and BRITISH MADE on one of the cuffs. This was the last Hiatt & Co. -- soon to become Hiatts -- handcuff, and the only post-darby model, to be produced in multiple sizes. Three versions were made during the decade. The immediate successor to the darbies, the 1960 Pattern retained the darby links.

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W. Dowler Darby Handcuffs
Single locking position, non-adjustable darby handcuffs from the British firm of Wm. Dowler & Sons, Great Charles Street, Birmingham (established 1774). This set likely was made by Hiatt, as Hiatt Chairman G. W. Cross relates, "We believe that W. Dowler was not a manufacturer, but merely a distributor or retailer of handcuffs, and possibly other police supplies, which had 'private labels' made by ourselves. We believe that W. Dowler was in business sometime between the 1880's and 1920's." Stamp-marked on both cuffs are BEST, WARRANTED WROUGHT, HARD and 23; W. DOWLER is stamp-marked on one cuff. Strong, sturdy, substantial and superbly made, with tight, powerful locks, this seldom seen 19th Century set retains approximately 95% of its original, heavy plating.

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Hiatt 1970 Pattern Handcuffs with Pouch
The Hiatt 1970 Pattern handcuff constituted a stylistic simplification of its predecessor, the 1960 Pattern. This pair is stamp-marked HIATT 1970 and BRITISH MADE on one of the cuffs, with the number 27 impressed on the back of the same cuff. Nickel plated steel, double locking, with its original key and pouch and in about mint condition. Click here for an image of the handcuffs and their pouch.

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Hiatts Model 2010 Handcuffs
The staple of the now-extensive Hiatts handcuff models, the 2010 set the standard for the contemporary active duty handcuff. Introduced in 1985, five years following the Hiatt bicentennial, the 2010 has been in continuous production longer than any Hiatts non-darby handcuff. Impressed HIATTS MADE IN ENGLAND on each side of each cuff casing, it was the first pair of handcuffs to replace BRITISH MADE with MADE IN ENGLAND. A serial number is on one side of one jaw. It also was the first Hiatts handcuff to accept the so-called universal, or standard, key -- a key common to the locks of most major manufacturers of handcuffs -- and was the handcuff Hiatts chose to premiere its exclusive back-loading feature. Of satin nickel finish steel, 9.5 ounces weight and in As New condition. Click here for an image of the Hiatts handcuffs box.

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Hiatts Model 2103 Speedcuff with Pouch
In the 1990s, Hiatts chairman Geoffrey William Cross designed an integral rigid steel handcuff with an ergonomic plastic grip. It was designated the Speedcuff Rapid Control System. Model 2103 is the steel deluxe satin nickel finish. The weight is 14 oz. The handcuffs double lock and incorporate Hiatts' back-loading feature. The circular disc in the grip's centre reads HIATTS UK. DES APPL. No. [Design Application Number] 2034362. This pair of cuffs comes with the Hiatts Model SCP5 black leather pouch with belt loop, this one number 5599. These handcuffs have been highly controversial since their introduction, their rigid design easily abused to inflict deliberate injury. Hiatts is not quite as explicit, stating instead, "Utilising pressure sensitive areas, it can be a significant aid to gaining control." Click here for an image of the handcuffs and their pouch.

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French prisoner transport chain
From France, four and forty inches of 19th to early 20th Century prime prisoner transport chain. The end rings and characteristic braided coiled links of nickel plated steel. Age has produced a smooth, deep, rich patina, providing a dark bronze appearance. Excellent condition. French convicts, if nothing else, travelled in style.

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Italian Padlocking Chain Handcuffs
Italian police, or carabinieri, chain handcuffs. Of French-style (or possibly French-made) links and two rings. The end link is passed through the inner ring to form the first cuff, then through the end ring to form the second cuff. The handcuff then is secured with a padlock. The handcuffs of nickel plated steel, the padlock of brass and hardened, or temperato, steel. The simple whilst effective design of the padlocking chain handcuff was used into the third quarter of the 20th Century. The Italians were not slaves to or intimidated by complex technology.

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Italian Bagno Handcuffs
Italian bagno handcuffs. The Italian word for handcuffs is manette. The bagno handcuff also is referred to as ferri di sicurezza da carabinieri, or "police irons of security". Of steel construction, the mechanism and operation are remarkably simple. Each hand is placed into one of the apertures. The wing nut at the bottom of the centre vertical bar then is screwed clockwise, elevating the horizontal bar until a snug, secure fit is attained. The wing nut and horizontal bar then may be fastened together with a padlock. The design is an effective one. Bagno means "bath" in Italian. The name derives, perhaps anecdotally, from the deep cells in the Paris Bastille where prisoners were incarcerated, which flooded at higher tides. The weight is a fairly impressive 22 ounces. The overall dimensions are 6 3/8" width X 6 5/8 " height.

Jack Tanis, 614 Broome Street, Fernandina Beach, FL 32034-3837, USA
Telephone: 904.261.4628
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