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Argus Iron Claw -- first version
Invented by Yngve Smith-Stange, The Iron Claw was the most commercially successful mechanical come along in the history of law enforcement. It also was the only one to be serial numbered sequentially. It was made for decades by the Argus Manufacturing Company of Chicago, then by Jay Pee of New York. The Iron Claw received two patents, the first (1,950,757) in 1934 and the second (2,066,654) in 1937. This quite early one, serial number 9053, was made between 18 July 1931, when the application for the first patent was filed, and 13 March 1934, when the first patent was granted. It is stamp-marked, on one side, THE IRON CLAW / 9053 and, on the other side, ARGUS MFG. CO. / CHICAGO ILL. U.S.A. / PAT. PEND. A fine first version model, yet significantly anomalous -- click here for detailed information.

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German Come Along -- Landes Polizei mark
German Police Mechanical Nipper/Come Along. At least three German mechanical nippers were made, each quite different. (The German term is Vorführzange, which translates to "pincers to produce a prisoner in, or to bring a prisoner before the, court", or Schliesszange, which translates to "closing, or locking, pincers".) Shown is an heavy German mechanical nipper of the Post-World War II era. Well made of nickel plated steel, it is all complete and fully functional. This piece is stamped with the highly sought, scarce LANDES POLIZEI (State Police) mark, and F 56.

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German Come Along -- Spring Mechanism
Showing the obverse of one and the reverse of another of two German spring mechanism nippers like the one above. A German patent (Patentschrift 244149) was issued 24 September 1910 to Reinhold Heid and Carl Roth for this design. Decades later, two subsequent patents were granted to Heid, one on 15 January 1951 (Patentschrift 1627533), the other on 6 August 1964 (Patentschrift 1898348), the application for which was filed on 8 June 1964 (Patentantrag 406039).

German Mechanical Come Along -- Landes Polizei mark  Landes Polizei stamp-mark
A superb example of another of the very few German mechanical police come along designs ever made, this marvellous piece also bears the LANDES POLIZEI (State Police) stamp-mark, as well as F 69 and 203. It has a brushed satin finish. The round button slides to double-lock the device. This nipper was invented by Wilhelm Heinkel, of Waiblingen (neighbouring Stuttgart), who was issued German patent 1904428 for it on 12 November 1964.

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German Come Along -- Ratchet Mechanism
Showing the obverse of one and the reverse of another of two German ratchet mechanism nippers like the one above.

Hiatt Steel Grip
Manufactured by Hiatt & Co., Ltd., of Masshouse Lane, Birmingham, this rare English come along/nipper dates to the 1st half of the 20th Century. This Hiatt Steel Grip retains 99% of its nickel plating, making it a virtually mint condition piece. Stamp-marked HIATT STEEL on one side and BRITISH MADE on the other. In October 1924, the price per dozen was 180/-, with nickel plating an extra 18/- per dozen, or 16/6d each.

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Hiatt Steel Grip
Another Hiatt Steel Grip, as smooth as silk and with a beautifully aged patina. 5 " height. One side of the handle stamp-marked HIATT, the other side, H.W and the top, G75. Tight, strong locking mechanism. Hiatt's grips were much more expensive than any of its darby handcuff models, and Hiatt made far fewer grips than it made handcuffs.

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Hiatt Steel Grip
Yet another Hiatt Steel Grip, stamp-marked HIATT. Nickel plated and fully functional.

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Hiatt Steel Grip with decorative rosettes
Some Hiatt Steel Grips, like this one, had a decorative circular plate, embossed with a rosette, covering each side of the pivot. This fine come along is nickel plated and stamp-marked HIATT STEEL. Click here to see another, also with rosette-embossed pivot covers and stamp-marked HIATT STEEL on one side, the other side stamp-marked 104. Coincidentally, 104 was the model number of Hiatt's non-adjustable darby Best London Handcuffs, which cost only 40% the price of Hiatt's Steel Grip; i.e., the Steel Grip was 250% as expensive.

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Hiatt Steel Grip
Mint condition, heavily plated Hiatt Steel Grip. Stamp-marked 79 only, still definitely, positively an Hiatt product.

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Pair of Hiatt Spurs with Straps
Hiatt produced a limited quantity of spurs. A fully intact, complete pair, with the straps, as is this pair, is rare. The rowels rotate freely, no part or piece is missing and the leather is supple. The heel of each spur is stamp-marked B.R.F.A. over HIATT over BIRMM [BIRMINGHAM]. These Hiatt spurs are nickel and in excellent condition. How rare are they? In May 2005, the chairman of Hiatts wrote, "Neither our historian nor ourselves were aware that Hiatt's made spurs."

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Pair of Hiatt Spurs with Heel Spikes
Another pair of nickel Hiatt spurs, these with iron heel spikes. The heel of each spur is stamp-marked SOLID NICKEL above the spike and HIATT over BIRMM [BIRMINGHAM] below the spike. Decorative rowels. Fully functional with no faults or flaws.

Jack Tanis, 614 Broome Street, Fernandina Beach, FL 32034-3837, USA
Telephone: 904.261.4628
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